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Archive for the ‘Media Ecology’ Category

Bill Thompson and I had a hilarious conversation the other morning with an incredulous former newspaper editor in which we tried to explain why Twitter might be interesting, even if it is currently just an example of leading-edge uselessness. Afterwards I thought that perhaps a movie might help. So I made one. See it here.

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Interesting approach by Forrester Research. Summary:

Many companies approach social computing as a list of technologies to be deployed as needed – a blog here, a podcast there – to achieve a marketing goal. But a more coherent approach is to start with your target audience and determine what kind of relationship you want to build with them, based on what they are ready for. Forrester categorizes social computing behaviors into a ladder with six levels of participation; we use the term “Social Technographics” to describe analyzing a population according to its participation in these levels. Brands, Web sites, and any other company pursuing social technologies should analyze their customers’ Social Technographics first, and then create a social strategy based on that profile.

Useful diagram too:

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Last Wednesday I gave a Keynote Address to a meeting of the Sussex Learning Network. There’s a pdf version of my lecture here.

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It’s amazing what you find on YouTube. Here’s an interview with Jurgen Habermas.

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From the BBC: Building Public Value paper…

“Recent BBC research shows that in 2004, children aged 10–14 are consuming over 20% less television per week than children of the same age a decade earlier. One reason is that many children now have a wider range of media devices in their bedrooms than their parents have in the living room”

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In April 20, 2006 edition of LRB. [Link.]

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Lovely, clever presentation.

Good example of how to use presentation software.

pdf filed in Media Ecology.

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